Inspired at the Art Science Museum (6 of 11)

As a child I have always loved the idea of angels. There are one of the most comforting symbols to me. Also I had no idea that Dali sculptures (not original ones) were found all over the world, in public spots, including some parts of Singapore. How could I have missed them then.

Snail and the Angel.

This sculpture occupies an important place in the Dalinian universe, as it is intimately connected with the artist’s encounter with Sigmund Freud, who Dali came to regard as his spiritual father. As part of the early Surrealist movement, Dali was surrounded by psychoanalytical influences, and these ideas were strongly incorporated into his artwork. As Dali believed that nothing occurred simply by accident, he was captivated when he saw a snail on a bicycle outside Freud’s house, connecting the snail with the image of a human head; more particularly, with the head of Freud…..

photo by bookjunkie

Triumphant Angel.

From the end of the 1940s, when the artist began weaving strong religious themes into his artworks

photo by bookjunkie

photo by bookjunkie

This one reminded me of a Quentin Blake illustration somehow. Wonder if Quentin Blake was inspired by Dali as well.

photo by bookjunkie

The giant thumb certainly made heads turn. This piece is called – Vision of the Angel.

…the strength and supremacy of God is represented by a thumb from which all life emerges (as represented by the branches). To the right of this divine being stands humanity: a man bursting with life’s vitality. On the left, the presence of the Angel, representative of the meditative spirit, can be found with his wing resting on and supported by a crutch. Through this theological composition, Dalí exalts the presence of the Divine, against and as compared with all false intellectual limitations.

photo by bookjunkie

photo by bookjunkie

About bookjunkie

Blogging about my daily life in Singapore helps with my mid life crisis.
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